NON-FICTION REVIEW: Underground: The Tokyo Gas Attack and the Japanese Psyche

Murakami Haruki is best known for his quiet magical realism, and he brings that same careful hand to this non-fiction book of testimonies regarding one of the most horrifying acts of violence to strike Japan.

True crime fans may or may not know of the Japanese death cult known as Aum Shinrikyo that was responsibly for the horrifying serin gas attack on the Japanese subways back in March of 1995. It was a horrible event that could have been much worse had their plan gone exactly as they had planned. To most, 27 deaths from something like this doesn’t seem like much at all, but the hundreds of people who were injured and that are affected to this day is something that I don’t think many people – especially North Americans – truly comprehend.

Murakami Haruki does an amazing job with the care he put into interviewing the victims of the attack who agreed to step forward and be a part of this book. Their testimonies (while repetitive due to the similar nature of their routines) are so human and heartbreaking, especially when they speak of collegues and friends who died, of the PTSD they suffer, of the rage they feel on behalf of their family members. It is fascinating to read about so many people be so nonchalant about the event and then the contrast against those who are upset about what happened. It’s been three years now since Asahara Shoko (the founder and leader of Aum) was executed as per his death sentence, but it has been on a long time since 1995. I know that reparations are still owed to the victims even to this day. Their suffering continues on even though the source of that pain is finally gone from the world.

I think Underground is an important read to consumers of true crime. It is a very humanizing and humbling read that reminds you that these victims are real people who went through a very real and traumatizing event. It’s easy for us to look at the numbers and not think much of a domestic terrorism attack like this, especially when next to other death cult numbers (such as Jonestown at 909 deaths), but that doesn’t make the event itself any less significant.

I recommend to take this book slowly, reading a testimony or two at a time before setting the book down again, but I recommend it all the same.

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